The loss of a Pennsylvania loved one is always traumatic, but the sudden and unexpected death of a young person can be particularly shocking. Losing a baby may prove especially devastating since the precious time spent with the child was cut tragically short. In cases where an

infant death

was caused by negligence in a medical facility, a Pennsylvania family may wish to know more about wrongful death action.

An infant’s death can be caused by a birth injury, negligent monitoring of a premature baby, incorrect medication administered to an infant or many other factors. What most of these scenarios have in common is that the negligence of another caused the death. In such situations, families are often entitled to compensation for damages. However, with a deceased person so young, many families understandably have questions about how the damages are calculated in a wrongful death lawsuit.

First, it is important to know that a true “price” cannot be put on an infant’s life. Instead, a wrongful death lawsuit aims to compensate families for specific damages suffered as the result of the loss of life. Since an infant did not earn an income during his or her brief life, some families may think wrongful death suits centering on infant deaths cannot be brought. These types of suits can be brought, but the financial loss suffered by the family — which will play a central role in awarding damages — will be determined based on a variety of factors. These include the age of the child, the health of the infant, the age and health of the parents or relatives claiming financial loss and the life expectancy of the baby.

Understandably, it is likely to be quite difficult for parents to ponder these factors in the midst of severe grief. A fatal accident in the medical realm can bring forth countless questions for the family of the deceased. An Erie wrongful death attorney can further inform families of their legal options and the ways in which a negligent provider can be held accountable.

Source: FindLaw.com, ”

Wrongful death cases: Children and the elderly

,” accessed on March 24, 2015